Article

Incretin levels and effect are markedly enhanced 1 month after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in obese patients with type 2 diabetes

Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
Diabetes care (Impact Factor: 7.74). 07/2007; 30(7):1709-16. DOI: 10.2337/dc06-1549
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Limited data on patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RY-GBP) suggest that an improvement in insulin secretion after surgery occurs rapidly and thus may not be wholly accounted for by weight loss. We hypothesized that in obese patients with type 2 diabetes the impaired levels and effect of incretins changed as a consequence of RY-GBP.
Incretin (gastric inhibitory peptide [GIP] and glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1]) levels and their effect on insulin secretion were measured before and 1 month after RY-GBP in eight obese women with type 2 diabetes and in seven obese nondiabetic control subjects. The incretin effect was measured as the difference in insulin secretion (area under the curve [AUC]) in response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to an isoglycemic intravenous glucose test.
Fasting and stimulated levels of GLP-1 and GIP were not different between control subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes before the surgery. One month after RY-GBP, body weight decreased by 9.2 +/- 7.0 kg, oral glucose-stimulated GLP-1 (AUC) and GIP peak levels increased significantly by 24.3 +/- 7.9 pmol x l(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.0001) and 131 +/- 85 pg/ml (P = 0.007), respectively. The blunted incretin effect markedly increased from 7.6 +/- 28.7 to 42.5 +/- 11.3 (P = 0.005) after RY-GBP, at which it time was not different from that for the control subjects (53.6 +/- 23.5%, P = 0.284).
These data suggest that early after RY-GBP, greater GLP-1 and GIP release could be a potential mediator of improved insulin secretion.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
99 Views
  • Source
    02/2015, Degree: PhD, Supervisor: Francisco Castro e Sousa
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Obesity and its associated diseases are a worldwide epidemic disease. Usual weight loss cures - as diets, physical activity, behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy - have been continuously implemented but still have relatively poor long-term success and mainly scarce adherence. Bariatric surgery is to date the most effective long term treatment for morbid obesity and it has been proven to reduce obesity-related co-morbidities, among them nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and mortality. This article summarizes such variations in gut hormones following the current metabolic surgery procedures. The profile of gut hormonal changes after bariatric surgery represents a strategy for the individuation of the most performing surgical procedures to achieve clinical results. About this topic, experts suggest that the individuation of the crosslink among the gut hormones, microbiome, the obesity and the bariatric surgery could lead to new and more specific therapeutic interventions for severe obesity and its co-morbidities, also non surgical.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine the effect of different Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures in gastric carcinoma patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of 54 patients with gastric cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus treated in the Department of General Surgery from January 2006 to June 2013 was conducted. The patients underwent gastrectomy using different Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures (traditional, n = 26; modified, n = 28). Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), two hour postprandial blood glucose (2 h PBG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were analyzed before surgery (0 mo) and 1, 3 and 6 mo after surgery. FPG and 2 h PBG levels were significantly decreased 1 mo after surgery in the traditional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (FPG 7.5 ± 1.3 vs 10.7 ± 1.2, P < 0.05) (2 h PBG 10.2 ± 1.8 vs 13.8 ± 3.2, P < 0.05). FPG and 2 h PBG levels were significantly decreased after surgery in the modified Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (FPG 6.9 ± 1.2 vs 10.5 ± 1.1, 6.5 ± 1.3 vs 10.5 ± 1.1, 6.4 ± 1.2 vs 10.5 ± 1.1, P < 0.05) (2 h PBG 9.9 ± 2.2 vs 14.1 ± 2.9, 9.2 ± 2.4 vs 14.1 ± 2.9, 8.9 ± 2.6 vs 14.1 ± 2.9, P < 0.05). Compared with the levels before surgery, HbA1c levels were significantly decreased 3 and 6 mo after surgery (7.2 ± 1.1 vs 10.5 ± 1.1, 5.5 ± 1.1 vs 10.5 ± 1.1, P < 0.05). Significant differences between the two groups regarding FPG, 2 h PBG and HbA1c concentration were observed 3 and 6 mo after surgery (FPG 10.1 ± 1.5 vs 6.5 ± 1.3, 10.3 ± 1.4 vs 6.4 ± 1.2, P < 0.05) (2 h PBG 13.1 ± 2.8 vs 9.2 ± 2.4, 13.6 ± 3.1 vs 8.9 ± 2.6, P < 0.05) (HbA1c 10.1 ± 1.4 vs 7.2 ± 1.1, 10.5 ± 1.3 vs 5.5 ± 1.1, P < 0.05). Modified Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can improve glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic patients with gastric cancer.

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
9 Downloads
Available from
Oct 28, 2014