Article

Ubiquitination by the anaphase-promoting complex drives spindle checkpoint inactivation.

Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
Nature (Impact Factor: 42.35). 05/2007; 446(7138):921-5. DOI: 10.1038/nature05734
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Eukaryotic cells rely on a surveillance mechanism known as the spindle checkpoint to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. The spindle checkpoint prevents sister chromatids from separating until all kinetochores achieve bipolar attachments to the mitotic spindle. Checkpoint proteins tightly inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), a ubiquitin ligase required for chromosome segregation and progression to anaphase. Unattached kinetochores promote the binding of checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1 to the APC-activator Cdc20, rendering it unable to activate APC. Once all kinetochores are properly attached, however, cells inactivate the checkpoint within minutes, allowing for the rapid and synchronous segregation of chromosomes. How cells switch from strong APC inhibition before kinetochore attachment to rapid APC activation once attachment is complete remains a mystery. Here we show that checkpoint inactivation is an energy-consuming process involving APC-dependent multi-ubiquitination. Multi-ubiquitination by APC leads to the dissociation of Mad2 and BubR1 from Cdc20, a process that is reversed by a Cdc20-directed de-ubiquitinating enzyme. The mutual regulation between checkpoint proteins and APC leaves the cell poised for rapid checkpoint inactivation and ensures that chromosome segregation promptly follows the completion of kinetochore attachment. In addition, our results suggest a mechanistic basis for how cancer cells can have a compromised spindle checkpoint without corresponding mutations in checkpoint genes.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
80 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cyclins are essential for cell proliferation, the cell cycle and tumorigenesis in all eukaryotes. UbcH10 regulates the degradation of cyclins in a ubiquitin-dependent manner. Here, we report that UbcH10 is likely involved in tumorigenesis. We found that cancer cells exposed to n-acetyl-leu-leu-norleucinal (ALLN) treatment and UbcH10 depletion exhibit a synergistic therapeutic effect. Abundant expression of UbcH10 drives resistance to ALLN-induced cell death, while cells deficient in UbcH10 were susceptible to ALLN-induced cell death. The depletion of UbcH10 hindered tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo, as assessed by colony formation, growth curve, soft agar and xenograft assays. These phenotypes were efficiently rescued through the introduction of recombinant UbcH10. In the UbcH10-deficient cells, alterations in the expression of cyclins led to cell cycle changes and subsequently decreases in tumorigenesis. The tumorigenesis of xenograft tumors from UbcH10-deficient cells treated with ALLN was decreased relative to wild-type cells treated with ALLN in nude mice. On the molecular level, we observed that UbcH10 deficiency enhances the activation of caspase 8 and caspase 3 but not caspase 9 to impair cell viability upon ALLN treatment. Collectively, our results suggest that, as an oncogene, UbcH10 is a potential drug target for the treatment of colorectal cancer.
    Scientific Reports 11/2014; 4:6910. · 5.08 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Protein modification with ubiquitin chains is an essential signaling event catalyzed by E3 ubiquitin ligases. Most human E3s contain a signature RING domain that recruits a ubiquitin-charged E2 and a separate domain for substrate recognition. How RING-E3s can build polymeric ubiquitin chains while binding substrates and E2s at defined interfaces remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the RING-E3 APC/C catalyzes chain elongation by strongly increasing the affinity of its E2 for the distal acceptor ubiquitin in a growing conjugate. This function of the APC/C requires its coactivator as well as conserved residues of the E2 and ubiquitin. APC/C's ability to track the tip of an emerging conjugate is required for APC/C-substrate degradation and accurate cell division. Our results suggest that RING-E3s tether the distal ubiquitin of a growing chain in proximity to the active site of their E2s, allowing them to assemble polymeric conjugates without altering their binding to substrate or E2.
    Molecular cell. 10/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Exit from mitosis is controlled by silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). It is important that preceding exit, all sister chromatid pairs are correctly bioriented, and that residual catenation is resolved, permitting complete sister chromatid separation in the ensuing anaphase. Here we determine that the metaphase response to catenation in mammalian cells operates through PKCε. The PKCε-controlled pathway regulates exit from the SAC only when mitotic cells are challenged by retained catenation and this delayed exit is characterized by BubR1-high and Mad2-low kinetochores. In addition, we show that this pathway is necessary to facilitate resolution of retained catenanes in mitosis. When delayed by catenation in mitosis, inhibition of PKCε results in premature entry into anaphase with PICH-positive strands and chromosome bridging. These findings demonstrate the importance of PKCε-mediated regulation in protection from loss of chromosome integrity in cells failing to resolve catenation in G2.
    Nature Communications 12/2014; 5:5685. · 10.74 Impact Factor