Article

Neuropsychological data in nondemented oldest old: the 90+ Study.

Institute of Brain Aging and Dementia, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology (Impact Factor: 2.16). 05/2007; 29(3):290-9. DOI: 10.1080/13803390600678038
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Although the oldest old are the fastest growing segment of the population, little is known about their cognitive performance. Our aim was to compile a relatively brief test battery that could be completed by a majority of individuals aged 90 or over, compensates for sensory losses, and incorporates previously validated, standardized, and accessible instruments. Means, standard deviations, and percentiles for 10 neuropsychological tests covering multiple cognitive domains are reported for 339 nondemented members of the 90+ Study. Cognitive performance declined with age for two-thirds of the tests. Performance on some tests was also affected by gender, education, and depression scores.

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