Article

Proportion of peripheral blood and decidual CD4+ CD25bright regulatory T cells in pre-eclampsia

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
Clinical & Experimental Immunology (Impact Factor: 3.28). 07/2007; 149(1):139-45. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2007.03397.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT CD4(+) CD25(bright) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells have been identified as a principle regulator of tolerance during pregnancy. In the setting of pre-eclampsia, however, little is known about the dynamics of these cells. In the current study, we determined CD4(+) CD25(bright) T(reg) cells in the peripheral blood using flow cytometry and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3(+)) cells at the placental bed using immunohistochemical staining. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 38 pre-eclamptic cases (17 cases Japanese, 21 cases Polish), 40 normal late pregnancy subjects (20 subjects Japanese, 20 subjects Polish), and 21 non-pregnant healthy controls (10 subjects Japanese, 11 subjects Polish) were included. We found the percentage of CD25(bright) cells within the CD4(+) T cell population in PBMC was reduced significantly in both Japanese and Polish pre-eclamptic cases than in normal pregnancy subjects (P < 0.001) and non-pregnant healthy controls (P < 0.001). Also, the percentage of FoxP3(+) cells within CD3(+) T cells in the placental bed biopsy samples of pre-eclamptic cases were decreased compared to those in normal pregnancy subjects. These findings suggest that a decreased number of T(reg) cells was present in pre-eclampsia, and these changes might break the maternal tolerance to the fetus.

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