Article

Family restaurant choices are associated with child and adult overweight status in Mexican-American families.

Division of Health Promotion, Center for Behavioral and Community Health Studies, San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego, CA 92123, USA.
Journal of the American Dietetic Association (Impact Factor: 3.8). 06/2007; 107(5):849-53. DOI: 10.1016/j.jada.2007.02.012
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Increasing evidence links restaurant food with overweight, but little is known about the relative roles of different types of restaurants, or the effects among Latinos. Using baseline data from an intervention trial, this study tested whether the type of restaurant a family reports visiting most often is associated with the body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)) of children and adults. Children, ages 4 to 7, and one primary caregiver for each child (94% mothers), were recruited through public elementary schools in southern San Diego County, CA, with at least 70% Latino enrollment. Weight and height measurements and survey information assessing family restaurant patronage were collected from 223 pairs of children and adults. Logistic regression results showed that children were most likely to be at risk of overweight (BMI >or=85th percentile) in families who ate most often at fast-food chains (odds ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 4.3). Parent overweight (BMI >or=25) was associated with eating at American restaurants, primarily buffets (odds ratio: 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.3 to 6.2). Both child and parent BMI were lowest in families selecting Mexican restaurants. Eating at fast-food chains and other Anglo-oriented restaurants may contribute to higher obesity rates linked to acculturation among Mexican Americans.

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