Article

Therapeutic efficacy and safety of undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) alone or in combination with (-)-hydroxycitric acid and chromemate in arthritic dogs.

Toxicology Department, Murray State University, Hopkinsville/Murray, KY 42240, USA.
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Impact Factor: 1.35). 07/2007; 30(3):275-8. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2885.2007.00844.x
Source: PubMed
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