Article

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in Humans and Animals, Central Europe

Robert Koch Institute, Wernigerode, Germany.
Emerging infectious diseases (Impact Factor: 7.33). 03/2007; 13(2):255-8. DOI: 10.3201/eid1302.060924
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus of clonal lineage ST398 that exhibits related spa types and contains SCCmec elements of types IVa or V has been isolated from colonized and infected humans and companion animals (e.g., dog, pig, horse) in Germany and Austria. Of particular concern is the association of these cases with cases of nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia.

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