Article

Effects of Applephenon and ascorbic acid on physical fatigue.

Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
Nutrition (Impact Factor: 3.05). 06/2007; 23(5):419-23. DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2007.03.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We examined the effects of Applephenon and ascorbic acid administration on physical fatigue.
In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, three-way crossover design, 18 healthy volunteers were randomized to oral Applephenon (1200 mg/d), ascorbic acid (1000 mg/d), or placebo for 8 d. The fatigue-inducing physical task consisted of workload trials on a bicycle ergometer at fixed workloads for 2 h on two occasions. During the test, subjects performed non-workload trials with maximum velocity for 10 s at 30 min (30-min trial) after the start of the test and 30 min before the end of the test (210-min trial).
The change in maximum velocity between the 30- and 210-min trials was higher in the group given Applephenon than in the group given placebo; ascorbic acid had no effect.
These results suggest that Applephenon attenuates physical fatigue, whereas ascorbic acid does not.

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