Article

[Painful legs and moving toes syndrome].

Servicio de Neurología, Clínica Puerta de Hierro, 28035 Madrid, Spain.
Revista Clínica Española (Impact Factor: 1.31). 06/2007; 207(5):246-8.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Painful legs and moving toes syndrome is a rare medical picture characterized by involuntary movements of the toes or the whole foot and pain in lower limbs. However, this must be kept in mind due to its association with other diseases and its possibility of being the first symptom. Spinal cord and cauda equina diseases, neuropathies, radiculopathies, drugs and other systemic diseases are the main cause of this syndrome although many cases are still idiopathic. Its diagnosis is essentially clinical and its treatment is complex, including different combinations of drugs and invasive techniques, and generally with a bad response.

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    ABSTRACT: Painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) is a rare syndrome characterized by spontaneous neuropathic pain and peculiar involuntary movements in the lower limbs, especially the toes and feet. As it is a relatively rare disorder worldwide, the exact pathophysiology still remains a mystery. Until recently, numerous methods of clinical treatments have been tried; however, the success rate of the therapies is still very low. Here, we report a case of PLMT and also summarize the recent clinical and research literatures regarding clinical presentation, electrophysiological features, etiology, treatment methods, and prognosis of this disorder. Doctors should be aware of this rare syndrome in a patient with painful and/or restless legs. On the other hand, multiple clinical treatments should be tried, even those which usually produce a poor outcome.
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    ABSTRACT: Painful legs and moving toes is a rare syndrome characterized by spontaneous neuropathic pain in the lower limbs associated with peculiar involuntary movements of the lower extremities, especially the toes and feet. Although its origin is unknown, it is associated to some pathologies. With regard to the painless variant, very few patients have been reported and most of them are idiopathic. We report a patient with involuntary movements of the toes similar to those seen in painful legs and moving toes syndrome, but without any associated pain and due to a spinal compression. We conclude that spinal lesions may produce the painless variant as it has been reported with the painful form.
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