Article

Auditory hallucinations in those populations that do not suffer from schizophrenia.

Department of Academic Clinical Psychiatry, SCANLab (Sheffield Cognition and Neuroimaging Laboratory), The University of Sheffield, The Longley Centre, Sheffield S5 7JT, United Kingdom.
Current Psychiatry Reports (Impact Factor: 3.05). 07/2007; 9(3):206-12. DOI: 10.1007/s11920-007-0020-z
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The following article discusses the phenomenon of auditory hallucinations in those who do not suffer from schizophrenia. Research has shown the occurrence of auditory hallucinations in the general population to such an extent that they cannot be said to be pathognomonic of psychiatric illness. In addition, it has long been known that certain hallucinatory experiences occur in health, such as hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations. However, there are fundamental differences in the characteristics of these experiences. In the psychiatric population, these tend to be frequent, intrusive, and distressing. In contrast, in the nonclinical population, these are often predominantly positive and nonthreatening. The exact mechanism for the occurrence of auditory hallucinations is not yet known, but it is hoped that through the study of those in health, the mechanisms that underpin pathophysiologic processes in clinical conditions also can be elucidated.

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