Article

T(H)1 cells control themselves by producing interleukin-10.

Division of Immunoregulation, The National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA, UK.
Nature reviews. Immunology (Impact Factor: 33.84). 07/2007; 7(6):425-8. DOI: 10.1038/nri2097
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Inflammatory T helper 1 (T(H)1)-cell responses successfully eradicate pathogens, but often also cause immunopathology. To minimize this deleterious side-effect the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is produced. Although IL-10 was originally isolated from T(H)2 cells it is now known to be produced by many cell types. Here, we discuss the recent evidence that shows that T(H)1 cells are the main source of IL-10 that controls the immune response against Leishmania major and Toxoplasma gondii infection.

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