Article

Predicting early academic achievement in a baccalaureate nursing program.

Oakland University School of Nursing, Rochester, MI 48309, USA.
Journal of Professional Nursing (Impact Factor: 0.88). 01/2007; 23(3):144-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.profnurs.2006.07.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Baccalaureate nursing programs are under increased pressure to graduate greater numbers of students to meet the demands of the nurse workforce of the future. Schools of nursing are admitting larger cohorts of students, but early academic achievement in the nursing major and retention are problematic. Historical predictors of early academic achievement, such as scholastic aptitude, may not be the best for identifying students at risk of early academic failure. Increasingly, baccalaureate nursing programs are relying on standardized nursing aptitude tests to evaluate the readiness of applicants for the nursing major. However, reliable predictors of early academic achievement have yet to be identified. The purpose of this study was to explore whether scholastic aptitude and nursing aptitude are predictive of early academic achievement in a baccalaureate nursing program. Using an exploratory descriptive design, data from 164 sophomore nursing students were examined. The data indicated that scholastic aptitude and nursing aptitude together predicted 20.2% of the variance in early academic achievement, with scholastic aptitude accounting for 15.4% of the variance.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
78 Views
  • Source
    Value in Health 01/2011; 14(7). · 2.89 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As medical knowledge and technology becomes more complex, twenty-first century nurses are required to possess an advanced understanding of many bioscience concepts. It is now recognised that without this advanced knowledge, nurses will not be sufficiently prepared to deal with the intellectual and technological demands of today, let alone the future. While the importance of bioscience education to nursing practice has been long recognised, nursing students, as a group, have a well documented struggle with science subjects. This struggle has been largely attributed to the lower university entrance scores required for nursing courses and a lack of previous science study. However, as in any complex system, a multitude of factors are likely to be responsible for the difficulty faced by many nursing students in their science studies. In this paper, we argue that a lack of engagement with science early in a student's life can significantly influence student's feelings towards science subjects, the achievement goals that they set themselves, and their interest in learning science. Given the wealth of evidence that high-school students are avoiding science-based subjects, low levels of engagement with science and high-levels of anxiety towards science-based subjects are issues increasingly faced by tertiary science educators. As such, understanding the science background of students, and improving their attitudes and feelings towards science, is a critical first step in helping nursing students learn the science required for their future practice. 'To practice safely and effectively, today's new nurses must understand a range of nursing knowledge and science, from normal and pathological physiology to genomics, pharmacology, biochemical implications of laboratory medicine for the patient's therapies, the physics of gas exchange in the lungs, cell-level transport of oxygen for the acutely ill patient, as well as the human experience of illness and normal growth and development – and much more.'
    International Journal of Innovation in Science and Mathematics Education. 01/2013; 21(2):26-36.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Accurately predicting NCLEX-RN® success has a positive impact on all nursing education stakeholders. This study focused on the ability to predict NCLEX-RN pass rates on the basis of prenursing academic aptitude variables and the Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) nursing aptitude program. The ATI predictors were the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) and fi ve ATI subject tests: Fundamentals, Medical Surgical, Nursing Care of Children, Mental Health, and Maternal Newborn. The prenursing variables comprised the prenursing grade point average, a prerequisite communication course, and the ATI TEAS composite subscores of TEAS Reading, TEAS Math, TEAS Science, and TEAS English. This study included participants from four baccalaureate nursing programs in the California State University system. Results of canonical correlation, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression revealed a significant correlation among prenursing, ATI scores, and NCLEXRN fi rst-try pass rates. Prediction of NCLEX-RN success rate using standardized testing data was supported, with the strongest predictors being the ATI Medical Surgical and ATI Mental Health tests.
    The Journal of nursing education. 03/2014; 53(3):151-9.