Article

Caring for patients of diverse religious traditions: Islam, a way of life for Muslims.

George Mason University, College of Health & Human Services, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, USA.
Home Healthcare Nurse 07/2007; 25(6):413-7. DOI: 10.1097/01.NHH.0000277692.11916.f3
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT You have been a nurse for many years, yet you have never cared for a patient who practices Islam until now. You are assigned to a Muslim family for a home visit. What aspects about Muslim beliefs and way of life might be helpful to know before your visit?

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