Article

Use of statins and risk of haematological malignancies: A meta-analysis of six randomized clinical trials and eight observational studies

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, and Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Athens, Greece.
British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology (Impact Factor: 3.69). 10/2007; 64(3):255-62. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2007.02959.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Statins have been suggested to prevent haematological malignancies. Several epidemiological studies have evaluated this association, while randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on cardiovascular outcomes have provided relevant data as secondary end-points. Our aim was to examine the strength of this association through a detailed meta-analysis of the studies published in peer-reviewed literature.
A comprehensive search for articles published up to December 2006 was performed, reviews of each study were conducted and data abstracted. Prior to meta-analysis, the studies were evaluated for publication bias and heterogeneity. Pooled relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the random effects model.
Fourteen studies (six RCTs, seven case-control and one cohort study) contributed to the analysis. Studies were grouped on the basis of study design, and two separate meta-analyses were conducted. There was no evidence of an association between statin use and haematological malignancies among either RCTs (RR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.72, 1.16) or the observational studies (RR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.53, 1.29). Similarly, we found no evidence of publication bias. However, high heterogeneity was detected among the observational studies.
Our meta-analysis findings do not support a potential role of statins in the prevention of haematological malignancies.

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