Article

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Unit Network Randomized Clinical Trial in Progress Standard therapy versus no therapy for mild gestational diabetes

Department of Obstetrics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1228, USA.
Diabetes care (Impact Factor: 8.57). 08/2007; 30 Suppl 2(Supplement 2):S194-9. DOI: 10.2337/dc07-s215
Source: PubMed
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    Evidence report/technology assessment 05/2008;