Article

Severe TMD/AMKL with GATA1 mutation in a stillborn fetus with Down syndrome.

Center for Personalized Genetic Healthcare, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.
Nature Clinical Practice Oncology (Impact Factor: 8). 08/2007; 4(7):433-8. DOI: 10.1038/ncponc0876
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A 34-year-old woman was referred for evaluation of a recent stillborn male fetus, gestational age 27 6/7 weeks, found to have congenital myeloid leukemia at autopsy. Autopsy findings included high weight for gestational age, hepatomegaly, and extensive intravascular leukemic infiltrates in the placenta, heart, liver, thymus, lung, kidneys, and brain. Genetic consultation and examination of photographs of the fetus revealed dysmorphic features.
Immunoperoxidase staining of placental tissue, fluorescence in situ hybridization of paraffin-embedded sections of the placenta using probes for t(12;21)(p13;q22), t(8;21)(q22;q22) and t/del(11q23), cytogenetic analysis of fetal tissue (tendon), sequence analysis of GATA1 in placental leukemic cells, and parental chromosome studies.
Down syndrome with in utero onset of GATA1 mutation-positive severe transient myeloproliferative disorder/acute megakaryoblastic leukemia.
Genetic counseling for the recurrence risk of Down syndrome on the basis of maternal age.

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