Article

Protein 4.1B suppresses prostate cancer progression and metastasis.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Cancer Research, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 08/2007; 104(31):12784-9. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0705499104
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Protein 4.1B is a 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin domain-containing protein whose expression is frequently lost in a variety of human tumors, including meningiomas, non-small-cell lung cancers, and breast carcinomas. However, its potential tumor-suppressive function under in vivo conditions remains to be validated. In a screen for genes involved with prostate cancer metastasis, we found that 4.1B expression is reduced in highly metastatic tumors. Down-regulation of 4.1B increased the metastatic propensity of poorly metastatic cells in an orthotopic model of prostate cancer. Furthermore, 4.1B-deficient mice displayed increased susceptibility for developing aggressive, spontaneous prostate carcinomas. In both cases, enhanced tumor malignancy was associated with reduced apoptosis. Because expression of Protein 4.1B is frequently down-regulated in human clinical prostate cancer, as well as in a spectrum of other tumor types, these results suggest a more general role for Protein 4.1B as a negative regulator of cancer progression to metastatic disease.

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