Article

SMN-independent subunits of the SMN complex - Identification of a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein assembly intermediate

Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6148, USA.
Journal of Biological Chemistry (Impact Factor: 4.6). 10/2007; 282(38):27953-9. DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M702317200
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The survival of motor neurons (SMN) complex is essential for the biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complexes in eukaryotic cells. Reduced levels of SMN cause the motor neuron degenerative disease, spinal muscular atrophy. We identify here stable subunits of the SMN complex that do not contain SMN. Sedimentation and immunoprecipitation experiments using cell extracts reveal at least three complexes composed of Gemin3, -4, and -5; Gemin6, -7, and unrip; and SMN with Gemin2, as well as free Gemin5. Complexes containing Gemin3-Gemin4-Gemin5 and Gemin6-Gemin7-unrip persist at similar levels when SMN is reduced. In cells, immunofluorescence microscopy shows differential localization of Gemin5 after cell stress. We further show that the Gemin5-containing subunits bind small nuclear RNA independently of the SMN complex and without a requirement for exogenous ATP. ATP hydrolysis is, however, required for displacement of small nuclear RNAs from the Gemin5-containing subunits and their assembly into snRNPs. These findings demonstrate a modular nature of the SMN complex and identify a new intermediate in the snRNP assembly process.

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