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Workshop on imaging science development for cancer prevention and preemption.

NIH/NCI/DCTD, Cancer Imaging Program, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Cancer biomarkers: section A of Disease markers (Impact Factor: 1.19). 02/2007; 3(1):1-33.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The concept of intraepithelial neoplasm (IEN) as a near-obligate precursor of cancers has generated opportunities to examine drug or device intervention strategies that may reverse or retard the sometimes lengthy process of carcinogenesis. Chemopreventive agents with high therapeutic indices, well-monitored for efficacy and safety, are greatly needed, as is development of less invasive or minimally disruptive visualization and assessment methods to safely screen nominally healthy but at-risk patients, often for extended periods of time and at repeated intervals. Imaging devices, alone or in combination with anticancer drugs, may also provide novel interventions to treat or prevent precancer.

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