Clinical practice guidelines

Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 7.26). 09/2007; 46(8):939-40; discussion 940-2. DOI: 10.1097/chi.0b013e318068fbdd
Source: PubMed
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    ABSTRACT: At the 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), the Academy's Workgroup on Research conducted a Research Forum entitled "Increasing Research Literacy Through the Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in Pediatric Psychiatry." Forum participants focused on speeding the adoption of EBP across five areas: EBP as the preferred heuristic for teaching research literacy, use of EBP in training programs, dissemination of EBP in clinical practice, EBP in partnership with industry, and EBP as a framework for developing practice guidelines. EBP provides an easy-to-understand method for accessing and evaluating the research literature and then applying this information to decisions about patient care. Although EBP has been gaining greater visibility in pediatric psychiatry, it is far from the preferred heuristic. To move the field toward fully embracing EBP will require greater understanding of what EBP is (and is not), educating mental health professionals in EBP skills, access to EBP resources, and a commitment to apply EBP to the conceptualization and design of research protocols and practice guidelines. Pediatric psychiatry would benefit from a principled commitment to follow other areas of medicine in adopting EBP.
    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 10/2007; 46(9):1098-110. DOI:10.1097/chi.0b013e318074eb48 · 7.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article provides a review of the magnitude of mental disorders in children and adolescents from recent community surveys across the world. Although there is substantial variation in the results depending upon the methodological characteristics of the studies, the findings converge in demonstrating that approximately one fourth of youth experience a mental disorder during the past year, and about one third across their lifetimes. Anxiety disorders are the most frequent conditions in children, followed by behavior disorders, mood disorders, and substance use disorders. Fewer than half of youth with current mental disorders receive mental health specialty treatment. However, those with the most severe disorders tend to receive mental health services. Current issues that are now being identified in the field of child psychiatric epidemiology include: refinement of classification and assessment, inclusion of young children in epidemiologic surveys, integration of child and adult psychiatric epidemiology, and evaluation of both mental and physical disorders in children.
    Dialogues in clinical neuroscience 02/2009; 11(1):7-20.
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