Article

Issues encountered in a qualitative secondary analysis of help-seeking in the prodrome to psychosis.

Community Health Systems Resource Group, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada.
The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research (Impact Factor: 1.03). 11/2007; 34(4):431-42. DOI: 10.1007/s11414-007-9079-x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Primary data are rarely used explicitly as a source of data outside of the original research purpose for which they were collected. As a result, qualitative secondary analysis (QSA) has been described as an "invisible enterprise" for which there is a "notable silence" amongst the qualitative research community. In this paper, we report on the methodological implications of conducting a secondary analysis of qualitative data focusing on parents' narratives of help-seeking activities in the prodrome to psychosis. We review the literature on QSA, highlighting the main characteristics of the approach, and discuss issues and challenges encountered in conducting a secondary analysis. We conclude with some thoughts on the implications for conducting a QSA in children's mental health services and research.

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