Article

Neurocognitive effects of methamphetamine: a critical review and meta-analysis.

Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego State University and University of California, San Diego, CA 92120, USA.
Neuropsychology Review (Impact Factor: 5.4). 10/2007; 17(3):275-97. DOI: 10.1007/s11065-007-9031-0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This review provides a critical analysis of the central nervous system effects of acute and chronic methamphetamine (MA) use, which is linked to numerous adverse psychosocial, neuropsychiatric, and medical problems. A meta-analysis of the neuropsychological effects of MA abuse/dependence revealed broadly medium effect sizes, showing deficits in episodic memory, executive functions, information processing speed, motor skills, language, and visuoconstructional abilities. The neuropsychological deficits associated with MA abuse/dependence are interpreted with regard to their possible neural mechanisms, most notably MA-associated frontostriatal neurotoxicity. In addition, potential explanatory factors are considered, including demographics (e.g., gender), MA use characteristics (e.g., duration of abstinence), and the influence of common psychiatric (e.g., other substance-related disorders) and neuromedical (e.g., HIV infection) comorbidities. Finally, these findings are discussed with respect to their potential contribution to the clinical management of persons with MA abuse/dependence.

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