Article

Effect of influenza vaccine status on winter mortality in Spanish community-dwelling elderly people during 2002-2005 influenza periods.

Primary Care Service of Tarragona-Valls, Institut Català de la Salut, Tarragona, Spain.
Vaccine (Impact Factor: 3.49). 10/2007; 25(37-38):6699-707. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2007.07.015
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study assessed the relationship between the reception of conventional inactivated influenza vaccine and winter mortality in a prospective cohort that included 11,240 Spanish community-dwelling elderly individuals followed from January 2002 to April 2005. Annual influenza vaccine status was a time-varying condition and primary outcome was all-cause death during study period. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazard models adjusted by age, sex and co-morbidity were used to evaluate vaccine effectiveness. Influenza vaccination was associated with a significant reduction of 23% in winter mortality risk during overall influenza periods. The attributable mortality risk in non-vaccinated people was 24 deaths per 100,000 persons-week within influenza periods, the prevented fraction for the population was 14%, and one death was prevented for every 239 annual vaccinations (ranging from 144 in Winter 2005 to 1748 in Winter 2002).

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