Article

The world is fat.

Center for Obesity, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
Scientific American (Impact Factor: 1.33). 10/2007; 297(3):88-95. DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0907-88
Source: PubMed
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