Murine nasal septa for respiratory epithelial air-liquid interface cultures

Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
BioTechniques (Impact Factor: 2.95). 09/2007; 43(2):195-6, 198, 200 passim. DOI: 10.2144/000112531
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Air-liquid interface models using murine tracheal respiratory epithelium have revolutionized the in vitro study of pulmonary diseases. This model is often impractical because of the small number of respiratory epithelial cells that can be isolated from the mouse trachea. We describe a simple technique to harvest the murine nasal septum and grow the epithelial cells in an air-liquid interface. The degree of ciliation of mouse trachea, nasal septum, and their respective cultured epithelium at an air-liquid interface were compared by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Immunocytochemistry for type IV beta-tubulin and zona occludens-1 (Zo-1) are performed to determine differentiation and confluence, respectively. To rule out contamination with olfactory epithelium (OE), immunocytochemistry for olfactory marker protein (OMP) was performed. Transepithelial resistance and potential measurements were determined using a modified vertical Ussing chamber SEM reveals approximately 90% ciliated respiratory epithelium in the nasal septum as compared with 35% in the mouse trachea. The septal air-liquid interface culture demonstrates comparable ciliated respiratory epithelium to the nasal septum. Immunocytochemistry demonstrates an intact monolayer and diffuse differentiated ciliated epithelium. These cultures exhibit a transepithelial resistance and potential confirming a confluent monolayer with electrically active airway epitheliumn containing both a sodium-absorptive pathway and a chloride-secretory pathway. To increase the yield of respiratory epithelial cells harvested from mice, we have found the nasal septum is a superior source when compared with the trachea. The nasal septum increases the yield of respiratory epithelial cells up to 8-fold.

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Available from: Brad Woodworth, Sep 26, 2015
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    • "However, due to presence of numerous cell types, matrices, and other environmental factors, explant culture models are less homogeneous, standarized, and reproducible than ALI culture models for primary epithelial cells (Table 1). It is well-known that the ALI system provides a well differentiated culture that has been developed in both human upper [19]–[23] and lower [19], [24]–[29] airways, as well as in different animals [30]–[32]. Human nasal epithelial cells cultured in an ALI system represent the most promising experimental tool for investigating repair and differentiation, as well as to perform pharmacological, toxicological, and transport studies [11], [25], [28], [33]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Primary human airway epithelial cells cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) develop a well-differentiated epithelium. However, neither characterization of mucociliar differentiation overtime nor the inflammatory function of reconstituted nasal polyp (NP) epithelia have been described.
    PLoS ONE 06/2014; 9(6):e100537. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0100537
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    • "Murine Sinonasal Epithelial cells (MNSE) were harvested and differentiated at an air-liquid interface previously described [16,17]. Briefly, tissue was harvested and grown on Costar 6.5-mm-diameter permeable filter supports (Corning Life Sciences, Lowell, MA) submerged in culture medium. "
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    ABSTRACT: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE). The CF nasal airway exhibits a similar ion transport defect as the lung, and colonization, infection, and inflammation within the nasal passages are common among CF patients. Nasal lavage fluid (NLF) is a minimally invasive means to collect upper airway samples. We collected NLF at the onset and resolution of CF APE and compared a 27-plex cytokine profile to stable CF outpatients and normal controls. We also tested IP-10 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of CF patients. Well-differentiated murine sinonasal monolayers were exposed to bacterial stimulus, and IP-10 levels were measured to test epithelial secretion. Subjects hospitalized for APE had elevated IP-10 (2582 pg/mL [95% CL of mean: 818,8165], N=13) which significantly decreased (647 pg/mL [357,1174], P<0.05, N =13) following antimicrobial therapy. Stable CF outpatients exhibited intermediately elevated levels (680 pg/mL [281,1644], N=13) that were less than CF inpatients upon admission (P=0.056) but not significantly different than normal controls (342 pg/mL [110,1061]; P=0.3, N=10). IP-10 was significantly increased in CF BALF (2673 pg/mL [1306,5458], N=10) compared to healthy post-lung transplant patients (8.4 pg/mL [0.03,2172], N=5, P<0.001). IP-10 levels from well-differentiated CF murine nasal epithelial monolayers exposed to Pseudomonas PAO-1 bacteria-free prep or LPS (100 nM) apically for 24 hours were significantly elevated (1159 ± 147, P<0.001 for PAO-1; 1373 ± 191, P<0.001 for LPS vs. 305 ± 68 for vehicle controls). Human sino-nasal epithelial cells derived from CF patients had a similar response to LPS (34% increase, P<0.05, N=6). IP-10 is elevated in the nasal lavage of CF patients with APE and responds to antimicrobial therapy. IP-10 is induced by airway epithelia following stimulation with bacterial pathogens in a murine model. Additional research regarding IP-10 as a potential biomarker is warranted.
    PLoS ONE 08/2013; 8(8):e72398. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0072398
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    • "Other possible mechanisms to escape the powerful forces of mechanical clearance include embedding into biofilms, lytic damage or direct invasion of host epithelial cells, or increase of mucus viscosity [11], [12]. However, simplified experimental (murine) models that allow for analysis of the dynamic interaction of pathogenic organisms and the highly specialized ciliated respiratory epithelium were difficult to establish and only recently became available [13], [14]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Mucociliary airway clearance is an innate defense mechanism that protects the lung from harmful effects of inhaled pathogens. In order to escape mechanical clearance, airway pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are thought to inactivate mucociliary clearance by mechanisms such as slowing of ciliary beating and lytic damage of epithelial cells. Pore-forming toxins like pneumolysin, may be instrumental in these processes. In a murine in vitro airway infection model using tracheal epithelial cells grown in air-liquid interface cultures, we investigated the functional consequences on the ciliated respiratory epithelium when the first contact with pneumococci is established. High-speed video microscopy and live-cell imaging showed that the apical infection with both wildtype and pneumolysin-deficient pneumococci caused insufficient fluid flow along the epithelial surface and loss of efficient clearance, whereas ciliary beat frequency remained within the normal range. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy demonstrated that pneumococci caused specific morphologic aberrations of two key elements in the F-actin cytoskeleton: the junctional F-actin at the apical cortex of the lateral cell borders and the apical F-actin, localized within the planes of the apical cell sides at the ciliary bases. The lesions affected the columnar shape of the polarized respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, the planar architecture of the entire ciliated respiratory epithelium was irregularly distorted. Our observations indicate that the mechanical supports essential for both effective cilia strokes and stability of the epithelial barrier were weakened. We provide a new model, where - in pneumococcal infection - persistent ciliary beating generates turbulent fluid flow at non-planar distorted epithelial surface areas, which enables pneumococci to resist mechanical cilia-mediated clearance.
    PLoS ONE 03/2013; 8(3):e59925. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0059925
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