Article

The treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

Centre for Hepatology, Division of Medicine, Royal Free Campus, Royal Free and University College Medical School, University College London, London, UK.
Metabolic Brain Disease (Impact Factor: 2.33). 01/2008; 22(3-4):389-405. DOI: 10.1007/s11011-007-9060-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Current recommendations for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy are based, to a large extent, on open or uncontrolled trials, undertaken in very small numbers of patients. In consequence, there is ongoing discussion as to whether the classical approach to the treatment of this condition, which aims at reducing ammonia production and absorption using either non-absorbable disaccharides and/or antibiotics, should be revisited, modified or even abandoned. Pros and cons of present therapeutic strategies and possible future developments were discussed at the fourth International Hannover Conference on Hepatic Encephalopathy held in Dresden in June 2006. The content of this discussion is summarized.

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