Article

What is the evidence for viscosupplementation in the treatment of patients with hip osteoarthritis? Systematic review of the literature.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, A.M.C, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery (Impact Factor: 1.31). 10/2007; 128(8):815-23. DOI: 10.1007/s00402-007-0447-z
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the synovial joints and is the most common cause of chronic pain in the elderly. One of the treatment modalities for OA of the hip is viscosupplementation (VS). Today there are several different formulations of viscosupplements produced by different manufactures of different molecular weights. The objective of this review is to asses the efficacy of VS treatment of hip OA osteoarthritis in the current literature.
The following databases were searched: Medline (period 1966 to November 2006), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1988 to November 2006), Cochrane Clinical Trial Register (1988 to November 2006), Database of Abstracts on Reviews and Effectiveness, Current Controlled Trials, National Research Register and Embase (January 1988 to November 2006). The search terms [osteoarthritis, hip (joint), viscosupplementation, hyaluronic acid, hyaluronan, sodium hyaluronate and trade names] were applied to identify all studies relating to the use of VS therapy for OA of the hip joint.
Sixteen articles concerning the efficacy of a total of 509 patients undergoing VS treatment for hip OA were included. Twelve European studies, three Turkish studies and one American study with Levels of Evidence ranging from I to IV evaluated the following products: Hylan G-F 20, Hyalgan, Ostenil, Durolane, Fermatron and Orthovisc. Heterogeneity of included studies did not allow pooled analysis of data.
Despite the relatively low Level of Evidence of the included studies, VS performed under fluoroscopic or ultrasound guidance seems an effective treatment and may be an alternative treatment of hip OA. Intra-articular injection of (derivatives of) HA into the hip joint appears to be safe and well tolerated. However, VS cannot be recommended as standard therapy in hip OA for wider populations, and therefore the indications remain a highly individualised matter.

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    • "Viscosupplementation injections for the management of osteoarthritis of the hip have been demonstrated to be both safe and effective [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9]. Acute injection related synovitis is observed in approximately 5–10% of patients undertaking this treatment, but these reactions are characteristically transient without longer-term clinical effects [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15]. "
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    ABSTRACT: We present the diagnosis of bilateral granulomatous inflammation of the hip joints associated with Hylan G-F 20 viscosupplementation injections. Clinicians recommending therapeutic Hylan injections for the management of hip arthritis should maintain clinical awareness regarding this potential complication.
    08/2014; 2014:494073. DOI:10.1155/2014/494073
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    ABSTRACT: Viscosupplementation (VS) with hyaluronic acid (HA) is largely used for knee osteoarthritis therapy, but the evidences for its usefulness in hip osteoarthritis (OA) are limited. In this review, an extensive search of published trials on VS in hip OA was performed. From the selected papers the following data were extracted: sample size, inclusion/exclusion criteria, treatment procedures, evaluation methods, follow-up duration and clinical outcomes. The level of evidence was low in quite all the trials (no placebo controlled groups). A reduction of pain and an improvement of function after 3 months, persistent in the long term (12-18 months), was observed. Patients with mild morphological alterations responded better to therapy. Side effects were negligible, and were limited to pain and a sensation of heaviness in the injection site. No clear differences among Low (LMW) and High Molecular Weight (HMW) HA preparations were found in the clinical outcomes. However, for HMW-HA preparations, a lower number of injections was, in general, necessary in order to reach the therapeutic effect. Despite the initial promising results, some questions still remain open : 1) the characteristics of responders must be more precisely defined; 2) the treatment schedules, at present mainly based on the individual clinical experience, need a proper and accepted standardization. Finally, larger and placebo controlled trials are necessary to confirm the efficacy of VS in hip OA.
    Upsala journal of medical sciences 02/2008; 113(3):261-77. DOI:10.3109/2000-1967-233 · 1.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop concise, patient-focussed, up to date, evidence-based, expert consensus recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA), which are adaptable and designed to assist physicians and allied health care professionals in general and specialist practise throughout the world. Sixteen experts from four medical disciplines (primary care, rheumatology, orthopaedics and evidence-based medicine), two continents and six countries (USA, UK, France, Netherlands, Sweden and Canada) formed the guidelines development team. A systematic review of existing guidelines for the management of hip and knee OA published between 1945 and January 2006 was undertaken using the validated appraisal of guidelines research and evaluation (AGREE) instrument. A core set of management modalities was generated based on the agreement between guidelines. Evidence before 2002 was based on a systematic review conducted by European League Against Rheumatism and evidence after 2002 was updated using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, the Cochrane Library and HTA reports. The quality of evidence was evaluated, and where possible, effect size (ES), number needed to treat, relative risk or odds ratio and cost per quality-adjusted life years gained were estimated. Consensus recommendations were produced following a Delphi exercise and the strength of recommendation (SOR) for propositions relating to each modality was determined using a visual analogue scale. Twenty-three treatment guidelines for the management of hip and knee OA were identified from the literature search, including six opinion-based, five evidence-based and 12 based on both expert opinion and research evidence. Twenty out of 51 treatment modalities addressed by these guidelines were universally recommended. ES for pain relief varied from treatment to treatment. Overall there was no statistically significant difference between non-pharmacological therapies [0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16, 0.34] and pharmacological therapies (ES=0.39, 95% CI 0.31, 0.47). Following feedback from Osteoarthritis Research International members on the draft guidelines and six Delphi rounds consensus was reached on 25 carefully worded recommendations. Optimal management of patients with OA hip or knee requires a combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities of therapy. Recommendations cover the use of 12 non-pharmacological modalities: education and self-management, regular telephone contact, referral to a physical therapist, aerobic, muscle strengthening and water-based exercises, weight reduction, walking aids, knee braces, footwear and insoles, thermal modalities, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and acupuncture. Eight recommendations cover pharmacological modalities of treatment including acetaminophen, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) non-selective and selective oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), topical NSAIDs and capsaicin, intra-articular injections of corticosteroids and hyaluronates, glucosamine and/or chondroitin sulphate for symptom relief; glucosamine sulphate, chondroitin sulphate and diacerein for possible structure-modifying effects and the use of opioid analgesics for the treatment of refractory pain. There are recommendations covering five surgical modalities: total joint replacements, unicompartmental knee replacement, osteotomy and joint preserving surgical procedures; joint lavage and arthroscopic debridement in knee OA, and joint fusion as a salvage procedure when joint replacement had failed. Strengths of recommendation and 95% CIs are provided. Twenty-five carefully worded recommendations have been generated based on a critical appraisal of existing guidelines, a systematic review of research evidence and the consensus opinions of an international, multidisciplinary group of experts. The recommendations may be adapted for use in different countries or regions according to the availability of treatment modalities and SOR for each modality of therapy. These recommendations will be revised regularly following systematic review of new research evidence as this becomes available.
    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 03/2008; 16(2):137-62. DOI:10.1016/j.joca.2007.12.013 · 4.66 Impact Factor