Article

SERPINE1 (PAI-1) is a prominent member of the early G0 --> G1 transition "wound repair" transcriptome in p53 mutant human keratinocytes.

Journal of Investigative Dermatology (Impact Factor: 6.37). 04/2008; 128(3):749-53. DOI: 10.1038/sj.jid.5701068
Source: PubMed

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Available from: Rohan Samarakoon, May 29, 2015
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