Article

Food reinforcement, the dopamine D2 receptor genotype, and energy intake in obese and nonobese humans.

Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214-3000, USA.
Behavioral Neuroscience (Impact Factor: 3.25). 11/2007; 121(5):877-86. DOI: 10.1037/0735-7044.121.5.877
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The authors measured food reinforcement, polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and dopamine transporter (DAT1) genes, and laboratory energy intake in 29 obese and 45 nonobese humans 18-40 years old. Food reinforcement was greater in obese than in nonobese individuals, especially in obese individuals with the TaqI A1 allele. Energy intake was greater for individuals high in food reinforcement and greatest in those high in food reinforcement with the TaqI A1 allele. No effect of the DAT1 genotype was observed. These data show that individual differences in food reinforcement may be important for obesity and that the DRD2 genotype may interact with food reinforcement to influence energy intake.

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