Article

Protective effects of paeonol on cultured rat hippocampal neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury

School of Medicine, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, Shandong 266003, PR China.
Journal of the Neurological Sciences (Impact Factor: 2.26). 02/2008; 264(1-2):50-5. DOI: 10.1016/j.jns.2007.06.057
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Mounting evidence has suggested that paeonol possesses plenty of pharmacologic actions. Our research is to determine if paeonol can protect cultured rat hippocampal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation(OGD)-induced injury and elucidate the underlying mechanism. We cultivated the rat hippocampal neurons as the object of study and then established the model of oxygen-glucose deprivation. Neuronal viability was measured by the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), while intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was observed by fluorospectrophotometer. The binding force of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was evaluated by liquid scintillation counting. Compared with oxygen-glucose deprivation group, paeonol treatment obviously increased cell survival rate and reduced the activity of the binding force of NMDA receptors, reversing the overload of intracellular Ca(2+). These results demonstrate that paeonol protected rat neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury, resulting in alleviating the morphological damage and increasing neuron viability and suggest that paeonol may exhibit its protective effect against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury by targeting on NMDA receptors.

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