Article

Manipulation of host-cell pathways by bacterial pathogens

University of British Columbia - Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Nature (Impact Factor: 42.35). 11/2007; 449(7164):827-34. DOI: 10.1038/nature06247
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Bacterial pathogens operate by attacking crucial intracellular pathways in their hosts. These pathogens usually target more than one intracellular pathway and often interact at several points in each of these pathways to commandeer them fully. Although different bacterial pathogens tend to exploit similar pathway components in the host, the way in which they 'hijack' host cells usually differs. Knowledge of how pathogens target distinct cytoskeletal components and immune-cell signalling pathways is rapidly advancing, together with the understanding of bacterial virulence at a molecular level. Studying how these bacterial pathogens subvert host-cell pathways is central to understanding infectious disease.

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Available from: Amit P Bhavsar, Aug 12, 2015
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    • "Pathogen–host interactions involve processes of microbial offence that are usually driven by molecules delivered directly into host cells and of host defence in response to the former. A set of microbial products from virus, bacteria, fungus and parasites has been already characterized as potent hijackers of host cell cellular properties and functions to the advantage of the microbe (Chisholm et al., 2006; Bhavsar et al., 2007; Roy and Mocarski, 2007). Although eukaryotic effectors are much less documented in comparison with their bacterial and viral counterparts, recent work on apicomplexan parasites , in particular on Toxoplasma, has unveiled novel effector proteins as key elements underlying the unique intricate relationships of these parasites with their hosts (Hunter and Sibley, 2012). "
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    • "Pathogen–host interactions involve processes of microbial offence that are usually driven by molecules delivered directly into host cells and of host defence in response to the former. A set of microbial products from virus, bacteria, fungus and parasites has been already characterized as potent hijackers of host cell cellular properties and functions to the advantage of the microbe (Chisholm et al., 2006; Bhavsar et al., 2007; Roy and Mocarski, 2007). Although eukaryotic effectors are much less documented in comparison with their bacterial and viral counterparts, recent work on apicomplexan parasites , in particular on Toxoplasma, has unveiled novel effector proteins as key elements underlying the unique intricate relationships of these parasites with their hosts (Hunter and Sibley, 2012). "
    • "SA is a master regulator of plant responses against biotrophic pathogens. Reciprocal antagonism between SA and JA has been described in at least 17 different species (Thaler et al. 2012) and is exploited by both pathogens and herbivores to manipulate plant defense responses (Bhavsar et al. 2007; Diezel et al. 2009; El Oirdi et al. 2011; Howe and Jander 2008; Musser et al. 2002). In tomato, exogenous application of SA has been shown to reduce JA biosynthesis and to inhibit defense responses against caterpillar herbivory (Chandok et al. 2004; Thaler et al. 2002, 2010). "
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