Article

Adolescent obesity and risk for subsequent major depressive disorder and anxiety disorder: Prospective evidence

Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
Psychosomatic Medicine (Impact Factor: 4.09). 12/2007; 69(8):740-7. DOI: 10.1097/PSY.0b013e31815580b4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To assess whether adolescent obesity is associated with risk for development of major depressive disorder (MDD) or anxiety disorder. Obesity has been linked to psychosocial difficulties among youth.
Analysis of a prospective community-based cohort originally from upstate New York, assessed four times over 20 years. Participants (n = 776) were 9 to 18 years old in 1983; subsequent assessments took place in 1985 to 1986 (n = 775), 1991 to 1994 (n = 776), and 2001 to 2003 (n = 661). Using Cox proportional hazards analysis, we evaluated the association of adolescent (age range, 12-17.99 years) weight status with risk for subsequent MDD or anxiety disorder (assessed at each wave by structured diagnostic interviews) in males and females. A total of 701 participants were not missing data on adolescent weight status and had > or = 1 subsequent assessments. MDD and anxiety disorder analyses included 674 and 559 participants (free of current or previous MDD or anxiety disorder), respectively. Adolescent obesity was defined as body mass index above the age- and gender-specific 95th percentile of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth reference.
Adolescent obesity in females predicted an increased risk for subsequent MDD (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3, 11.8) and for anxiety disorder (HR = 3.8; CI = 1.3, 11.3). Adolescent obesity in males was not statistically significantly associated with risk for MDD (HR = 1.5; CI = 0.5, 3.5) or anxiety disorder (HR = 0.7; CI = 0.2, 2.9).
Females obese as adolescents may be at increased risk for development of depression or anxiety disorders.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Elena N Naumova, Aug 27, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
392 Views
  • Source
    • "In a study in conducted adolescents; obesity was a predictor of an increased risk for developing major depressive disorder in females but not males (Anderson et al., 2007). In adolescent females obesity but not being overweight was significantly associated with future depressive symptoms but not major depression in a study that was conducted in 2010. "
    Dataset: 28 ozdemir
  • Source
    • "In a study in conducted adolescents; obesity was a predictor of an increased risk for developing major depressive disorder in females but not males (Anderson et al., 2007). In adolescent females obesity but not being overweight was significantly associated with future depressive symptoms but not major depression in a study that was conducted in 2010. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Obesity is public health burden and affects all age groups, including children and adolescents. For children aged between 2 and 19 years having a BMI ≥85th percentile but <95th percentile is defined as being overweight. Being obese is defined as having a BMI ≥95th percentile. Nutrition during early development is directly associated with future obesity. In case of having an obese mother; offspring's obesity onset occurs earlier regardless of race or ethnic groups. Obesity brings psychosocial problems with itself. Obese children may have difficulties in interacting socially with environment; may have problems particularly with their age groups. Withdrawal from the society may be a major problem. Preventive measures focusing parents, family and environment should begin at preconception. Maternal factors of childhood obesity can be eliminated, and risk factors for developing adolescent and adult obesity may be avoided. These measures may help us first to decrease the rate of obesity and achieve a downward trend in prevalence. This in turn; may decrease the number of people with obesity and obesity related diseases.
  • Source
    • "Notably, gender appears to be important in the relationship between depression and obesity, as several studies have found either a positive association in women but not men (Anderson et al., 2007; Foster, Wadden, Kendall, Stunkard, & Vogt, 1996; Pine et al., 2001; Richardson et al., 2003) or an inverse relationship between depression and obesity among men (Anderson et al., 2006; Carpenter, Hasin, Allison, & Faith, 2000; Scott et al., 2007). A large cohort study of more than 40,000 respondents found that women with higher BMI were at increased risk for both MDD and suicide ideation, but among men, lower BMI was associated with decreased risk for MDD, fewer suicide attempts, and less suicidal ideation (Carpenter et al., 2000). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Depression and Genetic variation in serotonin and monoamine transmission have both been associated with body mass index (BMI), but their interaction effects are not well understood. We examined the interaction between depressive symptoms and functional polymorphisms of serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) on categories of BMI. Participants were from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate interactions between candidate genes and depression on risk of obesity (BMI≥30) or overweight+obese combined (BMI≥25). Males with an MAOA active allele with high depressive symptoms were at decreased risk of obesity (OR 0.22; 95% CI 0.06–0.78) and overweight+obesity (OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.26–0.89). No similar effect was observed among females. These findings highlight that the obesity–depression relationship may vary as a function of gender and genetic polymorphism, and suggest the need for further study.
    Behavior Genetics 05/2009; 39(3):296-305. DOI:10.1007/s10519-009-9266-z · 2.84 Impact Factor
Show more