Article

Loss of Vac14, a regulator of the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate, results in neurodegeneration in mice.

Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2216, USA.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 11/2007; 104(44):17518-23. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0702275104
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The signaling lipid, phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P(2)), likely functions in multiple signaling pathways. Here, we report the characterization of a mouse mutant lacking Vac14, a regulator of PI(3,5)P(2) synthesis. The mutant mice exhibit massive neurodegeneration, particularly in the midbrain and in peripheral sensory neurons. Cell bodies of affected neurons are vacuolated, and apparently empty spaces are present in areas where neurons should be present. Similar vacuoles are found in cultured neurons and fibroblasts. Selective membrane trafficking pathways, especially endosome-to-TGN retrograde trafficking, are defective. This report, along with a recent report on a mouse with a null mutation in Fig4, presents the unexpected finding that the housekeeping lipid, PI(3,5)P(2), is critical for the survival of neural cells.

0 Followers
 · 
148 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects, and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in M. sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in Lepidoptera, making the leptidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages.
    Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ibmb.2015.02.003 · 3.42 Impact Factor
  • Source
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dynamic regulation of phosphoinositide lipids (PIPs) is crucial for diverse cellular functions, and, in neurons, PIPs regulate membrane trafficking events that control synapse function. Neurons are particularly sensitive to the levels of the low abundant PIP, phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P2], because mutations in PI(3,5)P2-related genes are implicated in multiple neurological disorders, including epilepsy, severe neuropathy, and neurodegeneration. Despite the importance of PI(3,5)P2 for neural function, surprisingly little is known about this signaling lipid in neurons, or any cell type. Notably, the mammalian homolog of yeast vacuole segregation mutant (Vac14), a scaffold for the PI(3,5)P2 synthesis complex, is concentrated at excitatory synapses, suggesting a potential role for PI(3,5)P2 in controlling synapse function and/or plasticity. PI(3,5)P2 is generated from phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) by the lipid kinase PI3P 5-kinase (PIKfyve). Here, we present methods to measure and control PI(3,5)P2 synthesis in hippocampal neurons and show that changes in neural activity dynamically regulate the levels of multiple PIPs, with PI(3,5)P2 being among the most dynamic. The levels of PI(3,5)P2 in neurons increased during two distinct forms of synaptic depression, and inhibition of PIKfyve activity prevented or reversed induction of synaptic weakening. Moreover, altering neuronal PI(3,5)P2 levels was sufficient to regulate synaptic strength bidirectionally, with enhanced synaptic function accompanying loss of PI(3,5)P2 and reduced synaptic strength following increased PI(3,5)P2 levels. Finally, inhibiting PI(3,5)P2 synthesis alters endocytosis and recycling of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), implicating PI(3,5)P2 dynamics in AMPAR trafficking. Together, these data identify PI(3,5)P2-dependent signaling as a regulatory pathway that is critical for activity-dependent changes in synapse strength.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 10/2014; 111(45). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1411117111 · 9.81 Impact Factor

Full-text

Download
57 Downloads
Available from
May 16, 2014