Article

Presenilin: Running with Scissors in the Membrane

Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Cell (Impact Factor: 33.12). 11/2007; 131(2):215-21. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2007.10.012
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The presenilin-containing gamma-secretase complex is an unusual membrane-embedded protease that processes a wide variety of integral membrane proteins, clearing protein stubs from the lipid bilayer and participating in critical signaling pathways. The protease is also central to Alzheimer's disease and certain cancers and is therefore an important therapeutic target. Here we highlight recent progress in deciphering the role of presenilin/gamma-secretase in biology and medicine and pose key questions for future study.

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