Article

Calculation of MRI-induced heating of an implanted medical lead wire with an electric field transfer function.

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA.
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Impact Factor: 2.57). 12/2007; 26(5):1278-85. DOI: 10.1002/jmri.21159
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To develop and demonstrate a method to calculate the temperature rise that is induced by the radio frequency (RF) field in MRI at the electrode of an implanted medical lead.
The electric field near the electrode is calculated by integrating the product of the tangential electric field and a transfer function along the length of the lead. The transfer function is numerically calculated with the method of moments. Transfer functions were calculated at 64 MHz for different lengths of model implants in the form of bare wires and insulated wires with 1 cm of wire exposed at one or both ends.
Heating at the electrode depends on the magnitude and the phase distribution of the transfer function and the incident electric field along the length of the lead. For a uniform electric field, the electrode heating is maximized for a lead length of approximately one-half a wavelength when the lead is terminated open. The heating can be greater for a worst-case phase distribution of the incident field.
The transfer function is proposed as an efficient method to calculate MRI-induced heating at an electrode of a medical lead. Measured temperature rises of a model implant in a phantom were in good agreement with the rises predicted by the transfer function. The transfer function could be numerically or experimentally determined.

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