Article

The Bilhaut-Cloquet procedure for Wassel types III, IV and VII thumb duplication

Department of Hand Surgery and Peripheral Nerve Surgery, University of Sydney, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia.
Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume) (Impact Factor: 2.19). 01/2008; 32(6):684-93. DOI: 10.1016/j.jhse.2007.05.021
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Five cases of Wassel types III, IV and VII thumb duplication underwent a Bilhaut-Cloquet procedure. A stable and mobile metacarpophalangeal joint was achieved in all cases. Interphalangeal joint motion was limited but this joint was stable in all cases. The nail ridge in these thumbs was minimal. A strong, stable thumb of normal size and good appearance can result from the Bilhaut-Cloquet procedure. When one nail is 70% of normal width, a modified procedure using the whole of one nail will avoid the nail ridge, but the nail will still differ from normal.

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