Article

Biological effects of EOs-a review. Food Chem Toxicol

Université Abdelmalek Essâadi, Faculté des Sciences, Laboratoire de Biologie et Santé, BP 2121, Tétouan, Morocco.
Food and Chemical Toxicology (Impact Factor: 2.9). 03/2008; 46(2):446-75. DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2007.09.106
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Since the middle ages, essential oils have been widely used for bactericidal, virucidal, fungicidal, antiparasitical, insecticidal, medicinal and cosmetic applications, especially nowadays in pharmaceutical, sanitary, cosmetic, agricultural and food industries. Because of the mode of extraction, mostly by distillation from aromatic plants, they contain a variety of volatile molecules such as terpenes and terpenoids, phenol-derived aromatic components and aliphatic components. In vitro physicochemical assays characterise most of them as antioxidants. However, recent work shows that in eukaryotic cells, essential oils can act as prooxidants affecting inner cell membranes and organelles such as mitochondria. Depending on type and concentration, they exhibit cytotoxic effects on living cells but are usually non-genotoxic. In some cases, changes in intracellular redox potential and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by essential oils can be associated with their capacity to exert antigenotoxic effects. These findings suggest that, at least in part, the encountered beneficial effects of essential oils are due to prooxidant effects on the cellular level.

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    • "The traditional control of such pests in stored food has relied primarily on synthetic insecticides like methyl bromide and phosphine (Shayya et al. 1997). However, due to their persistency and neurotoxic, carcinogenic , teratogenic, and mutagenic effects in non-target animals, and to the depleting effect on atmospheric ozone, the use of such chemicals is now under increasing restrictions for their environmental and human health hazards (Ayaz et al. 2010; Bakkali et al. 2008; Boyer et al. 2012; Ohr et al. 1996). Besides, several studies indicate an increase of the resistance of stored-product insects to conventional synthetic pesticides (Bell and Wilson 1995; Pretheep-Kumar et al. 2010; Kumar et al. 2010; Shukla and Toke 2013). "
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    si padova 2015; 06/2015
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