Article

Abuse of buprenorphine in the United States: 2003-2005.

Risk Management & Health Policy, Purdue Pharma L.P., Stamford, CT 06901-3431, USA.
Journal of Addictive Diseases (Impact Factor: 1.46). 02/2007; 26(3):107-11. DOI: 10.1300/J069v26n03_12
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study examines trends in the reported abuse of two sublingual buprenorphine products, Subutex and Suboxone, in the United States. Quarterly counts of abuse cases were obtained from 18 regional poison control centers (PCCS) for 2003-2005. Seventy-seven abuse cases were reported, of which 7.8 percent involved Subutex and 92.2 percent involved Suboxone. The average quarterly ratio of abuse cases per 1,000 prescriptions dispensed was 0.08 (SD +/- 0.09) for Subutex, and 0.16 (SD +/- 0.08) for Suboxone. Findings suggest that these sublingual buprenorphine formulations have a low rate of abuse based on toxico-surveillance data.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
108 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: To develop effective programs for people who are opioid dependent and to impact the opioid epidemic in New York City, it is crucial to monitor attitudes about opioid addiction treatments among opioid users who have experienced barriers to engagement and retention in addiction treatment. Design: The authors conducted a qualitative study using focus groups. Methods: Six focus groups in three needle exchanges in New York City were audio recorded, transcribed, and systematically coded. The authors report on the main themes related to the study objectives. Participants: Participants of each needle exchange who were opioid dependent and had some knowledge of both methadone and buprenorphine were eligible. Results: There were four main findings. Participants felt the following: 1) buprenorphine is an appropriate option for those heroin users who are motivated to stop using, 2) they have less control over their addiction treatment with methadone than they would have with buprenorphine, 3) buprenorphine treatment is not accessible to many New York City residents who would benefit from this treatment, and 4) lack of access to buprenorphine treatment is a cause of treatment-related diversion. Conclusions: Both methadone maintenance and buprenorphine treatment opportunities are necessary to address the diverse treatment needs of opioid-dependent people in New York City. However, the current medical model of buprenorphine treatment may be too restrictive for some opioid-dependent people and may be contributing to the use of illicit buprenorphine. New models to deliver buprenorphine treatment may address these problems.
    Journal of opioid management 9(2):111-119.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To review current evidence on buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nx) for the treatment of opioid-use disorders, with a focus on strategies for clinical management and office-based patient care. Medline and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Consensus reports, guidelines published, and other authoritative sources were also included in this review. Apart from expert guidelines, data included in this review constitute level 1 evidence. Bup/nx is a partial μ-opioid agonist combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4:1 ratio. It has a lower abuse potential, carries less stigma, and allows for more flexibility than methadone. Bup/nx is indicated for both inpatient and ambulatory medically assisted withdrawal (acute detoxification) and long-term substitution treatment (maintenance) of patients who have a mild-to-moderate physical dependence. A stepwise long-term substitution treatment with regular monitoring and follow-up assessment is usually preferred, as it has better outcomes in reducing illicit opioid use, minimizing concomitant risks such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C transmission, retaining patients in treatment and improving global functioning. Bup/nx is safe and effective for opioid detoxification and substitution treatment. Its unique pharmaceutical properties make it particularly suitable for office-based maintenance treatment of opioid-use disorder.
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 01/2014; 10:587-598. · 2.00 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The use of prescription opioid drugs has the potential to lead to patient abuse of these medications, addiction, and diversion. Such an abuse is associated with increased costs because of excessive healthcare utilization. Finding ways to minimize the risk for abuse and addiction can enhance patient outcomes and reduce costs to patients and to payers.
    American Health and Drug Benefits 03/2011; 4(2):107-14.

Full-text

View
1 Download
Available from