Article

Asymmetric paternalism to improve health behaviors

Department of Social and Decision Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213-3890, USA.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 12/2007; 298(20):2415-7. DOI: 10.1001/jama.298.20.2415
Source: PubMed

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Available from: George Loewenstein, Jun 02, 2015
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