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The effect of phosphatidylserine on golf performance

Increnovo LLC, 2138 E Lafayette Pl, Milwaukee, WI 53202, USA. .
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (Impact Factor: 1.91). 12/2007; 4(1):23. DOI: 10.1186/1550-2783-4-23
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed to evaluate the effect of oral phosphatidylserine (PS) supplementation on golf performance in healthy young golfers with handicaps of 15-40.
Perceived stress, heart rate and the quality of the ball flight was evaluated before (pre-test) and after (post-test) 42 days of 200 mg per day PS (n = 10) or placebo (n = 10) intake in the form of a nutritional bar. Subjects teed-off 20 times aiming at a green 135 meters from the tee area.
PS supplementation significantly increased (p < 0.05) the number of good ball flights (mean: pre-test 8.3 +/- 3.5, post-test 10.1 +/- 3.0), whereas placebo intake (mean: pre-test 7.8 +/- 2.4, post-test 7.9 +/- 3.6) had no effect. PS supplementation showed a trend towards improving perceived stress levels during teeing-off (mean: pre-test 5.8 +/- 2.0, post-test 4.0 +/- 2.0, p = 0.07), whereas stress levels remained unchanged in the placebo group (mean: pre-test: 5.1 +/- 2.0, post-test: 5.1 +/- 3.1). Supplementation did not influence mean heart rate in either group.
It is concluded that six weeks of PS supplementation shows a statistically not significant tendency (p = 0.07) to improve perceived stress levels in golfers and significantly improves (p < 0.05) the number of good ball flights during tee-off which might result in improved golf scores.

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    • "PS has been shown to blunt stress induced increases in cortisol (Starks et al., 2008) and to significantly decrease b-1 power in the right hemispheric frontal brain regions before and after stress (Baumeister et al., 2008). These beneficial effects result in an increase in performance during a calculus test (Parker et al., 2011) and an increase in motor skills in golf players (J€ ager et al., 2007). Protein kinase C (PKC) plays an important role in controlling memory relevant signalling process. "
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