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Isolation of a multi-functional endogenous cellulase gene from mollusc, Ampullaria crossean.

Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China.
Sheng wu hua xue yu sheng wu wu li xue bao Acta biochimica et biophysica Sinica 11/2003; 35(10):941-6.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The cellulase genes of some animals, most coding for endo-beta-1,4-glucanases, were found and cloned. There has been no reports about genes encoding exo-beta-1,4-glucanase or endo- -1,4-xylanase from animal. Here we cloned the cDNA of a cellulase designated as EGX from mollusc, Ampullaria crossean, and expressed it in Pichia pastoris for the first time. The cellulase EGX is a multi-functional beta cellulase with the activities of exo-beta-1,4-glucanase, endo-beta-1,4-glucanase and endo-beta-1,4-xylanase. The opening reading frame of EGX cDNA is 1185 bp and encodes 395 amino acids. The EGX gene can also be amplificated from the genomic DNA by PCR, which verified the endogenous origin of this gene. This EGX gene was the first multi-functional cellulase gene that was directly isolated from animals.

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