Article

A correlation study of immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and clinical features of 180 AML patients in China

Center for Stem Cell Research and Application, Institute of Hematology, Union Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.
Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry (Impact Factor: 2.28). 01/2008; 74(1):25-9. DOI: 10.1002/cyto.b.20368
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT New WHO classification has been widely applied in the diagnosis of leukemia. To elucidate the immunophenotype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and characterize the correlation among morphological, immunological, cytogenetic, and clinical features, we studied the bone marrow immunophenotypes of 180 AML patients in China by flow cytometry. The results showed that CD34, CD2, CD14, CD19, CD56, and HLA-DR were correlated with FAB subtypes. Amongst the 180 patients enrolled in this study, 122 cases were also subjected to karyotype analysis by G-banding technology and abnormal karyotypes were detected in 69 out of 122 patients. Correlation assay showed that t(8;21) was only present in 16 AML-M2 patients, and strongly associated with the individual or combinational expressions of CD15/CD19/CD34/CD56. As to M3, although lymphoid lineage antigens were observed in a considerable number of patients, they were never detected in t(15;17) positive patients. The expressions of CD22, CD56, and TdT showed significant correlation with the overall presence of abnormal karyotype. Additionally, the expressions of CD4, CD7, CD14, CD56, and TdT were positively correlated with clinical features such as white blood cell count, platelet count, and patient's age. In conclusion, immunophenotype analysis was useful for AML diagnosis and classification. At the same time, the data also suggested that the karyotype abnormalities and clinical features were tightly linked with abnormal antigen expression characteristics in AML patients. As one of the largest correlative study performed in China, the results highlighted the importance of a morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic classification of AML that might constitute a working basis for future studies aimed at a better definition of clinicopathological features and optimal treatment strategy for these leukemias.

0 Followers
 · 
257 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Detection of minimal residual disease is recognized as an important post-therapy risk factor in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Two most commonly used methods for residual disease monitoring are real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and multiparameter flow cytometry. Results so far are very promising, whereby it is likely that minimal residual disease results will enable to guide future post-remission treatment strategies. However, the leukemic clone may change between diagnosis and relapse due to instability of the tumor cells. This instability may already be evident at diagnosis if different subpopulations of tumor cells coexist. Such tumor heterogeneity, which may be reflected by immunophenotypic, molecular and/or cytogenetic changes, can have important consequences for minimal residual disease detection, since false-negative results can be expected to be the result of losses of aberrancies used as minimal residual disease markers. In this review the role of such changes in minimal residual disease monitoring is explored. Furthermore, possible causes of tumor instability are discussed, whereby the concept of clonal selection and expansion of a chemotherapy resistant subpopulation is highlighted. Accordingly, detailed knowledge of the process of clonal evolution is required to improve both minimal residual disease risk stratification and patient outcome. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.
    Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry 08/2013; DOI:10.1002/cytob.21134 · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the expression of brain and acute leukemia, cytoplasmic (BAALC) and analyze its clinical significance in Chinese de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) was carried out to detect BAALC transcript level in 121 de novo AML patients and 41 normal controls. BAALC transcript level in AML patients was significantly up-regulated compared with normal controls (P < 0.001). Patients with high BAALC expression had significantly older age than those with low BAALC expression (P = 0.021). The percentage of blasts in bone marrow of the BAALC high-expressed patients was significantly higher than that in the low-expressed patients (P < 0.001). The incidence of BAALC overexpression was significantly higher in M0/M1 (8/9, 89 %) and M2 subtypes (33/48, 68 %) than in M3 subtype (6/27, 22 %) (P < 0.001). The frequency of IDH1/2 wild type in CN-AML patients with high BAALC expression was significantly higher than those with low BAALC expression (P = 0.031). BAALC high-expressed patients had a significantly lower complete remission than low-expressed patients in both entire AML cohort and CN-AML (P = 0.013 and 0.029, respectively). Furthermore, both whole AML cohort and CN-AML patients with high BAALC expression showed a shorter overall survival than those with low BAALC expression (P = 0.002 and 0.008, respectively). Multivariate analysis confirmed high BAALC expression as an independent adverse prognostic factor in both AML and CN-AML patients. Our study indicates that overexpression of BAALC serves as an independent prognostic biomarker in both whole AML cohort and CN-AML patients.
    Medical Oncology 01/2015; 32(1):386. DOI:10.1007/s12032-014-0386-9 · 2.06 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Detection of minimal residual disease is recognized as an important post-therapy risk factor in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Two most commonly used methods for residual disease monitoring are real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and multiparameter flow cytometry. The results so far are very promising, whereby it is likely that minimal residual disease results will enable to guide future post-remission treatment strategies. However, the leukemic clone may change between diagnosis and relapse due to the instability of the tumor cells. This instability may already be evident at diagnosis if different subpopulations of tumor cells coexist. Such tumor heterogeneity, which may be reflected by immunophenotypic, molecular, and/or cytogenetic changes, can have important consequences for minimal residual disease detection, since false-negative results can be expected to be the result of losses of aberrancies used as minimal residual disease markers. In this review the role of such changes in minimal residual disease monitoring is explored. Furthermore, possible causes of tumor instability are discussed, whereby the concept of clonal selection and expansion of a chemotherapy-resistant subpopulation is highlighted. Accordingly, detailed knowledge of the process of clonal evolution is required to improve both minimal residual disease risk stratification and patient outcome. © 2013 International Clinical Cytometry Society.
    Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry 01/2014; 86(1). DOI:10.1002/cyto.b.21134 · 2.28 Impact Factor

Preview

Download
3 Downloads
Available from