Article

Chronic pain in Machado-Joseph disease: a frequent and disabling symptom.

Department of Neurology, Universidade Estadual de Campinas-UNICAMP, Rua Tessália Vieira de Camargo, 126 Cidade Universitaria Zeferino Vaz, Campinas, SP, Brazil.
JAMA Neurology (Impact Factor: 7.01). 01/2008; 64(12):1767-70. DOI: 10.1001/archneur.64.12.1767
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is one of the most common forms of neurodegenerative ataxia characterized by remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity. Although patients frequently report pain, systematic evaluation of this clinical feature is lacking.
To compare the frequency of chronic pain among patients with genetically confirmed MJD, an age- and sex-matched healthy control group, and a disease control group of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
We included 70 patients with MJD, 20 patients with ALS, and 70 control subjects from 2 clinical centers. All individuals underwent assessment with a standardized pain questionnaire. In addition, we used a visual analog scale to quantify pain intensity.
Thirty-three patients with MJD (47%), 3 patients with ALS (15%), and 6 controls (9%) reported chronic pain. Lower back pain preceded ataxia in 6 patients with MJD. Twenty-nine patients with MJD had daily pain, which was continuous in 23. The mean visual analog scale score was 6.1 in patients with MJD. Pain was musculoskeletal in 26 patients with MJD, dystonic in 2, neuropathic in 2, and mixed in 3. Typically, pain was lumbar (n = 17) or in the lower limbs (n = 15). We did not find significant differences regarding duration of disease, sex, or severity of ataxia among patients with MJD with and without chronic pain. Expanded (CAG)(n) tandem repeats were longer in patients with MJD who experienced chronic pain (67.3 vs 65.2; P = .04).
In our series, pain was significantly more frequent in patients with MJD than in controls. Chronic pain was a frequent and often disabling complaint among patients with MJD. The lower back was the most frequently reported location of pain in patients with MJD.

1 Follower
 · 
103 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AIMS: Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is an inherited spinocerebellar ataxia caused by the expansion of trinucleotide CAG repeats in the gene encoding ataxin-3. The clinical manifestations of SCA3 include peripheral neuropathy, which is an important cause of disability in a subset of patients. Although the loss of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) has been postulated to be the cause of this neuropathy, the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated. METHODS: To clarify the clinicopathological characteristics of SCA3-associated peripheral neuropathy, we performed nerve conduction studies and histopathological analyses. Nerve conduction studies were carried out in 18 SCA3 patients. Immunohistochemical analyses of the anterior and posterior roots of the spinal cord and peripheral nerves were performed in five SCA3 patients. We also employed immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy analyses with an anti-polyglutamine antibody. RESULTS: The mean sensory nerve action potentials of the SCA3 patients were half of the normal values. The motor conduction velocities were decreased, and the distal latencies were also significantly prolonged in the nerves studied relative to the those in normal controls. Histopathological analyses detected axonal sprouting and myelin thinning in all cases. Ataxin-3 aggregates were found in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells in all of the SCA3 patients examined but not in control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to the previously reported neuronopathy, the results of the present study indicate that Schwann cells are involved in the formation of the pathogenic intracytoplasmic ataxin-3 protein aggregates in patients with SCA3-associated neuropathy.
    Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology 04/2013; 40(5). DOI:10.1111/nan.12055 · 4.97 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 or Machado-Joseph disease is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide, and the high frequency of nonmotor manifestations in Machado-Joseph disease demonstrates how variable is the clinical expression of this single genetic entity. Anatomical, physiological, clinical, and functional neuroimaging data reinforce the idea of a degenerative process involving extracerebellar regions of the nervous system in Machado-Joseph disease. Brain imaging and neuropathologic studies have revealed atrophy of the pons, basal ganglia, midbrain, medulla oblongata, multiple cranial nerve nuclei, and thalamus and of the frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital, and limbic lobes. This review provides relevant information about nonmotor manifestations and extracerebellar symptoms in Machado-Joseph disease. The main nonmotor manifestations of Machado-Joseph disease described in previous data and discussed in this article are: sleep disorders, cognitive and affective disturbances, psychiatric symptoms, olfactory dysfunction, peripheral neuropathy, pain, cramps, fatigue, nutritional problems, and dysautonomia. In addition, we conducted a brief discussion of noncerebellar motor manifestations, highlighting movement disorders. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.
    Movement Disorders 08/2013; 28(9). DOI:10.1002/mds.25513 · 5.63 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with major socioeconomic impact, whose neurobiological basis is still not clear. An involvement of the neurovascular unit (NVU) has been recently proposed. In particular, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), two NVU key players, may be affected during the development of chronic pain; in particular, transient permeabilization of the barrier is suggested by several inflammatory- and nerve-injury-based pain models, and we argue that the clarification of molecular BBB/BSCB permeabilization events will shed new light in understanding chronic pain mechanisms. Possible biases in experiments supporting this theory and its translational potentials are discussed. Moving beyond an exclusive focus on the role of the endothelium, we propose that our understanding of the mechanisms subserving chronic pain will benefit from the extension of research efforts to the NVU as a whole. In this view, the available evidence on the interaction between analgesic drugs and the NVU is here reviewed. Chronic pain comorbidities, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are also discussed in view of NVU changes, together with innovative pharmacological solutions targeting NVU components in chronic pain treatment.
    Mediators of Inflammation 05/2013; 2013:648268. DOI:10.1155/2013/648268 · 2.42 Impact Factor