Article

Antibodies against fetal brain in sera of mothers with autistic children

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, United States.
Journal of Neuroimmunology (Impact Factor: 2.79). 03/2008; 194(1-2):165-72. DOI: 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2007.11.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Serum antibodies in 100 mothers of children with autistic disorder (MCAD) were compared to 100 age-matched mothers with unaffected children (MUC) using as antigenic substrates human and rodent fetal and adult brain tissues, GFAP, and MBP. MCAD had significantly more individuals with Western immunoblot bands at 36 kDa in human fetal and rodent embryonic brain tissue. The density of bands was greater in fetal brain at 61 kDa. MCAD plus developmental regression had greater reactivity against human fetal brain at 36 and 39 kDa. Data support a possible complex association between genetic/metabolic/environmental factors and the placental transfer of maternal antibodies in autism.

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Available from: Donald C. Gause, Jul 06, 2015
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