Article

Normative pediatric visual acuity using single surrounded HOTV optotypes on the Electronic Visual Acuity Tester following the Amblyopia Treatment Study protocol

Retina Foundation of Southwest, Dallas, Texas 75231, USA.
Journal of AAPOS: the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (Impact Factor: 1.14). 05/2008; 12(2):145-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaapos.2007.08.014
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To provide normative pediatric visual acuity data using HOTV optotypes presented on the Electronic Visual Acuity Tester following the Amblyopia Treatment Study (ATS) protocol.
Monocular testing was conducted on 384 healthy full-term children ranging from 3 to 10 years of age (mean, 5.4 years; SD, 1.8 years). A total of 373 children completed monocular testing of each eye. In addition, 23 adults (mean, 28.7 years; SD, 4.9 years) were tested for comparison. Both monocular visual acuity and interocular acuity differences were recorded.
Mean visual acuity improved by slightly more than one line (0.12 logMAR) from 3 years of age to adulthood, increasing from 0.08 logMAR to -0.04 logMAR (F(6,400) = 26.3, p < 2.0 x 10(-26)). At all ages, mean interocular acuity difference was less than one line on a standard acuity chart (overall mean difference = 0.04 logMAR; SD, 0.06 logMAR).
These results represent the first normative data reported for HOTV optotypes using the ATS protocol on the Electronic Visual Acuity Tester. These data may play an important role in clinical practice, screening, and clinical research.

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Available from: Christina S Cheng, Sep 04, 2014
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