Article

A common genetic variant in the neurexin superfamily member CNTNAP2 increases familial risk of autism.

McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
The American Journal of Human Genetics (Impact Factor: 11.2). 02/2008; 82(1):160-4. DOI: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2007.09.015
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Autism is a childhood neuropsychiatric disorder that, despite exhibiting high heritability, has largely eluded efforts to identify specific genetic variants underlying its etiology. We performed a two-stage genetic study in which genome-wide linkage and family-based association mapping was followed up by association and replication studies in an independent sample. We identified a common polymorphism in contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2), a member of the neurexin superfamily, that is significantly associated with autism susceptibility. Importantly, the genetic variant displays a parent-of-origin and gender effect recapitulating the inheritance of autism.

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