The Safety of Probiotics

Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases and Department of Medicine, Tufts-New England Medical Center, and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.
Clinical Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 8.89). 03/2008; 46 Suppl 2(Suppl 2):S104-11; discussion S144-51. DOI: 10.1086/523331
Source: PubMed


Probiotics are generally defined as microorganisms that, when consumed, generally confer a health benefit on humans. There is considerable interest in probiotics for a variety of medical conditions, and millions of people around the world consume probiotics daily for perceived health benefits. Lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and lactococci have generally been regarded as safe. There are 3 theoretical concerns regarding the safety of probiotics: (1) the occurrence of disease, such as bacteremia or endocarditis; (2) toxic or metabolic effects on the gastrointestinal tract; and (3) the transfer of antibiotic resistance in the gastrointestinal flora. In this review, the evidence for safety of the use of or the study of probiotics is examined. Although there are rare cases of bacteremia or fungemia related to the use of probiotics, epidemiologic evidence suggests no population increase in risk on the basis of usage data. There have been many controlled clinical trials on the use of probiotics that demonstrate safe use. The use of probiotics in clinical trials should be accompanied by the use of a data-safety monitoring board and by knowledge of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of the organism used.

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    • "acidophilus, L. casei, L. salivarius, L. lactis, B. bifidum, and B. infantis) suppressed the growth of most pathogens that caused pancreatitis complications in the preclinical animal studies,[29] while this bacterial mixture that was used in the treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis could increase the patient’s mortality rate.[30] In addition, others reported that bacteremia and fungemia would be developed in ill patients and immunodeficient individuals after using probiotic bacteria.[31] Probiotics might also cause sepsis in immunocompromised populations. "
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic rhinitis is a skewed immune reaction to common antigens in the nasal mucosa; current therapy is not satisfactory and can cause a variety of complications. In recent decades, the incidence of allergic rhinitis is increasing every year. Published studies indicate that probiotics are beneficial in treating allergic rhinitis. This review aims to help in understanding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. We referred to the PubMed database as data source. This review focuses on the following aspects: The types of probiotics using in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, approaches of administration, its safety, mechanisms of action, treating results, and the perspectives to improve effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review reports the recent findings regarding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Probiotics are a useful therapeutic remedy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, but its underlying mechanisms remain to be further investigated.
    North American Journal of Medical Sciences 08/2013; 5(8):465-468. DOI:10.4103/1947-2714.117299
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    • "One of the most important characteristics of probiotics is their safety for human health, that is one of the crucial points for their selection. In particular, the characterization of a probiotic strain is based on the absence of resistance to clinical or veterinary antibiobiotics as well as the absence of virulence factors [38]. "
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    ABSTRACT: The exact prevalence of food allergy in the general population is unknown, but almost 12% of pediatric population refers a suspicion of food allergy. IgE mediated reactions to food are actually the best-characterized types of allergy, and they might be particularly harmful especially in children. According to the “hygiene hypothesis” low or no exposure to exogenous antigens in early life may increase the risk of allergic diseases by both delaying the development of the immune tolerance and limiting the Th2/Th1 switch. The critical role of intestinal microbiota in the development of immune tolerance improved recently the interest on probiotics, prebiotics, antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acid, folate and vitamins, which seem to have positive effects on the immune functions. Probiotics consist in bacteria or yeast, able to re-colonize and restore microflora symbiosis in intestinal tract. One of the most important characteristics of probiotics is their safety for human health. Thanks to their ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and to modulate and stabilize the composition of gut microflora, probiotics bacteria may play an important role in the regulation of intestinal and systemic immunity. They actually seem capable of restoring the intestinal microbic equilibrium and modulating the activation of immune cells. Several studies have been recently conducted on the role of probiotics in preventing and/or treating allergic disorders, but the results are often quite contradictory, probably because of the heterogeneity of strains, the duration of therapy and the doses administered to patients. Therefore, new studies are needed in order to clarify the functions and the utility of probiotics in food allergies and ion other types of allergic disorders.
    Italian Journal of Pediatrics 07/2013; 39(1):47. DOI:10.1186/1824-7288-39-47 · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    • "Probiotics are defined as live bacterial strains conferring various benefits to the consumer by modulating the intestinal ecosystem, thereby potentially promoting host health and improving host disease risk.1–11 Various probiotic strains have been industrially developed and marketed as a variety of products and applications such as fermented foods and supplements, including yogurt12–15 Most probiotics taxonomically belong to two genera, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, that originate from various environments, including the human intestine, and both species are generally regarded as safe.16–18 "
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    ABSTRACT: Probiotics are live microorganisms that potentially confer beneficial outcomes to host by modulating gut microbiota in the intestine. The aim of this study was to comprehensively investigate effects of probiotics on human intestinal microbiota using 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes with an improved quantitative accuracy for evaluation of the bacterial composition. We obtained 158 faecal samples from 18 healthy adult Japanese who were subjected to intervention with 6 commercially available probiotics containing either Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus strains. We then analysed and compared bacterial composition of the faecal samples collected before, during, and after probiotic intervention by Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and UniFrac distances. The results showed no significant changes in the overall structure of gut microbiota in the samples with and without probiotic administration regardless of groups and types of the probiotics used. We noticed that 32 OTUs (2.7% of all analysed OTUs) assigned to the indigenous species showed a significant increase or decrease of ≥10-fold or a quantity difference in >150 reads on probiotic administration. Such OTUs were found to be individual specific and tend to be unevenly distributed in the subjects. These data, thus, suggest robustness of the gut microbiota composition in healthy adults on probiotic administration.
    DNA Research 04/2013; 20(3). DOI:10.1093/dnares/dst006 · 5.48 Impact Factor
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