Article

Adolescent same-sex and both-sex romantic attractions and relationships: implications for smoking.

Steps Program Office, Division of Adult and Community Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE, Mailstop K-85, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.
American Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 3.93). 04/2008; 98(3):462-7. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2006.097980
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between smoking and romantic attractions and relationships.
We used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to assess associations of smoking at Waves I and II with same-sex, both-sex, and opposite-sex romantic attractions or relationships as determined at Wave I. We used logistic regression to predict smoking at Wave II by sexual orientation.
Both adolescent boys and adolescent girls with both-sex attractions or relationships were significantly more likely than those with opposite-sex attractions or relationships to be current smokers. Adolescent boys and girls with both-sex attractions or relationships who were nonsmokers at Wave I were more likely to be current smokers at Wave II than those with opposite-sex attractions or relationships.
Our findings support previous research on smoking among youths who report same-sex or both-sex romantic attractions or relationships and demonstrate the increased risk bisexual youths have for smoking initiation and smoking prevalence. Tobacco use prevention programs targeting gay and bisexual youths are warranted, particularly among adolescent girls and boys who have had both-sex romantic attractions or relationships.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
121 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives. We examined sexual orientation differences in adolescent smoking and intersections with race/ethnicity, gender, and age. Methods. We pooled Youth Risk Behavior Survey data collected in 2005 and 2007 from 14 jurisdictions; the analytic sample comprised observations from 13 of those jurisdictions (n = 64 397). We compared smoking behaviors of sexual minorities and heterosexuals on 2 dimensions of sexual orientation: identity (heterosexual, gay-lesbian, bisexual, unsure) and gender of lifetime sexual partners (only opposite sex, only same sex, or both sexes). Multivariable regressions examined whether race/ethnicity, gender, and age modified sexual orientation differences in smoking. Results. Sexual minorities smoked more than heterosexuals. Disparities varied by sexual orientation dimension: they were larger when we compared adolescents by identity rather than gender of sexual partners. In some instances race/ethnicity, gender, and age modified smoking disparities: Black lesbians-gays, Asian American and Pacific Islander lesbians-gays and bisexuals, younger bisexuals, and bisexual girls had greater risk. Conclusions. Sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, gender, and age should be considered in research and practice to better understand and reduce disparities in adolescent smoking.
    American Journal of Public Health 06/2014; 104(6):1137-47. · 3.93 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives. We examined sexual orientation disparities in cancer-related risk behaviors among adolescents. Methods. We pooled data from the 2005 and 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Surveys. We classified youths with any same-sex orientation as sexual minority and the remainder as heterosexual. We compared the groups on risk behaviors and stratified by gender, age (< 15 years and > 14 years), and race/ethnicity. Results. Sexual minorities (7.6% of the sample) reported more risk behaviors than heterosexuals for all 12 behaviors (mean = 5.3 vs 3.8; P < .001) and for each risk behavior: odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2, 1.4) to 4.0 (95% CI = 3.6, 4.7), except for a diet low in fruit and vegetables (OR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.5, 0.8). We found sexual orientation disparities in analyses by gender, followed by age, and then race/ethnicity; they persisted in analyses by gender, age, and race/ethnicity, although findings were nuanced. Conclusions. Data on cancer risk, morbidity, and mortality by sexual orientation are needed to track the potential but unknown burden of cancer among sexual minorities. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print December 12, 2013: e1-e10. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301506).
    American Journal of Public Health 12/2013; · 3.93 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives. We examined the role of adolescent peer violence victimization (PVV) in sexual orientation disparities in cancer-related tobacco, alcohol, and sexual risk behaviors. Methods. We pooled data from the 2005 and 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Surveys. We classified youths with any same-sex sexual attraction, partners, or identity as sexual minority and the remainder as heterosexual. We had 4 indicators of tobacco and alcohol use and 4 of sexual risk and 2 PVV factors: victimization at school and carrying weapons. We stratified associations by gender and race/ethnicity. Results. PVV was related to disparities in cancer-related risk behaviors of substance use and sexual risk, with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03, 1.6) to 11.3 (95% CI = 6.2, 20.8), and to being a sexual minority, with ORs of 1.4 (95% CI = 1.1, 1.9) to 5.6 (95% CI = 3.5, 8.9). PVV mediated sexual orientation disparities in substance use and sexual risk behaviors. Findings were pronounced for adolescent girls and Asian/Pacific Islanders. Conclusions. Interventions are needed to reduce PVV in schools as a way to reduce sexual orientation disparities in cancer risk across the life span.
    American Journal of Public Health 06/2014; 104(6):1113-23. · 3.93 Impact Factor

Full-text

View
0 Downloads
Available from