Article

Proximate outcomes of gatekeeper training for suicide prevention in the workplace

Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, Ny 14642, USA.
Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior (Impact Factor: 1.4). 01/2008; 37(6):659-70. DOI: 10.1521/suli.2007.37.6.659
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In this pilot study we report on proximate outcomes of a 1-hour community gatekeeper training in-service for 76 nonclinical employees in a university hospital workplace setting. Pre-post analyses resulted in positive changes in participants' knowledge about suicide and attitudes (self-efficacy) about intervening with suicidal individuals. A subset of participants engaged in role play practice of gatekeeper skills following training and rated the experience positively. Fifty-five observations were rated using an observational measure developed for this study and approximately half of these demonstrated satisfactory skills post training. Participants in this workplace gatekeeper training reported sharing new knowledge and skills with family, friends, and coworkers.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Kerry L Knox, Jun 23, 2015
2 Followers
 · 
412 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There are a number of published studies on workplace suicide prevention activities, and an even larger number of activities that are not reported on in academic literature. The aim of this review was to provide a systematic assessment of workplace suicide prevention activities, including short-term training activities, as well as suicide prevention strategies designed for occupational groups at risk of suicide. The search was based on Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) Guidelines. The databases used for the searches were the Cochrane Trials Library and PubMed. A range of suicide prevention websites were also searched to ascertain the information on unpublished workplace suicide prevention activities. Key characteristics of retrieved studies were extracted and explained, including whether activities were short-term training programmes or developed specifically for occupations at risk of suicide. There were 13 interventions relevant for the review after exclusions. There were a few examples of prevention activities developed for at-risk occupations (e.g. police, army, air force and the construction industry) as well as a number of general awareness programmes that could be applied across different settings. Very few workplace suicide prevention initiatives had been evaluated. Results from those that had been evaluated suggest that prevention initiatives had beneficial effects. Suicide prevention has the potential to be integrated into existing workplace mental health activities. There is a need for further studies to develop, implement and evaluate workplace suicide prevention programmes.
    Health Promotion International 09/2014; 30(1). DOI:10.1093/heapro/dau085 · 1.94 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is great interest in the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments and practices for children across schools and community mental health settings. A growing body of literature suggests that the use of one-time workshops as a training tool is ineffective in influencing therapist behavior and patient outcomes and that ongoing expert consultation and coaching is critical to actual uptake and quality implementation. Yet, we have very limited understanding of how expert consultation fits into the larger implementation support system, or the most effective consultation strategies. This commentary reviews the literature on consultation in child mental health, and proposes a set of core consultation functions, processes, and outcomes that should be further studied in the implementation of evidence-based practices for children.
    Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research 05/2013; DOI:10.1007/s10488-013-0502-8 · 3.44 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This review offers practical recommendations regarding research on training in evidence-based practices for mental health and substance abuse treatment. When designing training research, we recommend: (a) aligning with the larger dissemination and implementation literature to consider contextual variables and clearly defining terminology, (b) critically examining the implicit assumptions underlying the stage model of psychotherapy development, (c) incorporating research methods from other disciplines that embrace the principles of formative evaluation and iterative review, and (d) thinking about how technology can be used to take training to scale throughout all stages of a training research project. An example demonstrates the implementation of these recommendations.
    Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research 03/2011; 38(4):223-37. DOI:10.1007/s10488-011-0338-z · 3.44 Impact Factor