Article

PharmGKB and the International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium: the changing role for pharmacogenomic databases and single-drug pharmacogenetics.

Department of Genetics, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
Human Mutation (Impact Factor: 5.21). 05/2008; 29(4):456-60. DOI: 10.1002/humu.20731
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT PharmGKB, the pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics knowledge base (www.pharmgkb.org) is a publicly available online resource dedicated to the dissemination of how genetic variation leads to variation in drug responses. The goals of PharmGKB are to describe relationships between genes, drugs, and diseases, and to generate knowledge to catalyze pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic research. PharmGKB delivers knowledge in the form of curated literature annotations, drug pathway diagrams, and very important pharmacogene (VIP) summaries. Recently, PharmGKB has embraced a new role--broker of pharmacogenomic data for data sharing consortia. In particular, we have helped create the International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC), which is devoted to pooling genotype and phenotype data relevant to the anticoagulant warfarin. PharmGKB has embraced the challenge of continuing to maintain its original mission while taking an active role in the formation of pharmacogenetic consortia.

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